Episode 15: Mark Curnutte, Reporting, and Race

Mark Curnutte has been on the faculty of Miami University in Oxford Ohio for the past several years where he teaches courses on journalism and social justice. He is also a multi-award-winning career newspaper journalist who has reported extensively on social issues of race, class, poverty, homelessness, and immigration, including for the Cincinnati Enquirer where he worked 25 years. Over 80 of the articles he wrote for the Enquirer are reproduced in his most recent book: “Across the Color Line: Reporting 25 Years in Black Cincinnati."

Our guest for this episode – in which our focus is racial equity in media reporting - is Mark Curnutte (http://www.miamioh.edu/cas/academics/departments/sociology-gerontology/about/faculty-staff/mark-curnutte/index.html). 

Mark Curnutte has been on the faculty of Miami University in Oxford Ohio for the past several years where he teaches courses on journalism and social justice. He is also a multi-award-winning career newspaper journalist who has reported extensively on social issues of race, class, poverty, homelessness, and immigration, including for the Cincinnati Enquirer where he worked 25 years. Over 80 of the articles he wrote for the Enquirer are reproduced in his most recent book: “Across the Color Line: Reporting 25 Years in Black Cincinnati" (https://ucincinnatipress.uc.edu/9781947602014/across-the-color-line/)

The following video, from the Columbus Metropolitan Club on the subject of “How Media Perpetuates Bias,” is mentioned during the podcast: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tJmrAVs3B9A

Real Issues: Real Conversations is hosted and produced by Rachel Hopkin.

***

Real Issues: Real Conversations is a production of Ohio Humanities, the state-based partner of the National Endowment for the Humanities. The views expressed in the podcast do not necessarily reflect those of the National Endowment. 

This program is part of “Democracy and the Informed Citizen,” an initiative administered by the Federation of State Humanities Councils. The project seeks to deepen our knowledge and appreciation of the vital connections between democracy, the humanities, journalism, and an informed citizenry. 

Many thanks to The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for their generous support of this initiative and the Pulitzer Prizes for their partnership.

The podcast’s opening and closing music is provided by Sokolovsky Music.

To learn more about Ohio Humanities podcasts and other projects and programs, please visit www.ohiohumanities.org
© 2019 Ohio Humanities